Sugaring

By mid February you really notice that the days are getting longer and the sun is getting higher. So do the maple trees. Sap begins to drip from broken branches on sunny afternoons. It takes a pretty good warm-up to get sap flowing from the roots and out the tap holes we've drilled. Once the trees have really thawed, the run really gets going. For the next four to five weeks the steady rhythm of collecting and processing sap, boiling and bottling syrup is only interrupted by a day that didn't warm up or got too warm. Then the maples begin to bud, the sap gets cloudy, the syrup very dark and the season is over. From starting to drill tap holes to pulling them out is maybe two months. The two months from deep snow in the woods to green patches of wild leeks and a frozen barnyard to the mud drying up. The rush of late spring is upon us and we don't think about sugaring again until you notice the days getting longer again. 

Buckets on the trees
Buckets on the trees

Sap collection in the old days at the farm More

Firing the Evaporator
Firing the Evaporator

Our old evaporator More

Sap into the evaporator
Sap into the evaporator

Sap was being gravity fed into the old wood-fired evaporator. More

New Evaporator
New Evaporator

New in 2015 More

Boiling
Boiling

Dicken checking the syrup More

Finished product
Finished product

100% Pure Maple Syrup More

Maple Cream
Maple Cream

There is nothing more delicious than Maple Cream! More